Watchsmith

Enhance Apple Watch Complications with Watchsmith

Introducing Watchsmith – David Smith:

Watchsmith is an application that seeks to give you complete control over the appearance and utility of your Apple Watch.

First, it provides a wide array of complications. Each of these is completely customizable, with controls for things like font, color, hand type and location. The initial set is just over 50 unique complications, with dozens more planned down the road. My goal is to provide a complication for just about every use and let you make it look just how you want. In the absence of 3rd-party watch faces, this is the closest I can get to making my own watch faces.

Second, rather than simply providing a static display of the complication you configure, Watchsmith lets you dynamically schedule the complications to appear on your watch face. This is done using time based triggers (with plans for additional trigger types down the road).

In a world where Apple Watch third-party Watch Faces are non-existent, it is refreshing to see a Dev pushing the envelope of what is possible to modify existing functionalities available on the Watch Face in such an astounding way. Such capabilities give users some semblance of Watch Face customisation they so desire. For those that like to have more granular control over the customisation of their Apple Watch complications, Watchsmith is here to fulfil that desire with 96,605 permutations of complication styles and settings1.

My favourite feature in Watchsmith is the ability to schedule complications.

The BirchTree watchOS 7 Concept

Matt Birchler, as he usually does, has put together a very achievable list of where and how certain aspects of the watchOS experience can be improved upon for the upcoming watchOS 7, with many of his suggestions geared towards giving more power and granular control to the user.

On improving interactions on the Apple Watch:

This one is pretty vague, but Apple should make a run through of the things you do on the watch and try to remove one tap from the process. This “one tap less” initiative would look at analytics for what people do on their watches most and would simply try to remove one tap from the process. We’re not rewriting the whole OS yet, but optimizing flows so people are more likely to do them on the watch than pull out their phone would help a lot.

Being an advocate of less is more, I occasionally review how I do, and how certain things are done to see if there’s any room to improve efficiency by removing at least one step out of the process, and I agree with Matt that there are numerous areas, if not all areas of the watchOS that would significantly benefit from less interactive friction.

Give it a read: watchOS 7: A BirchTree Concept.